top of page

Tenzing Asian Art

72dpi_2K7A9063_Edited.jpg

Can you tell us more about your background? Why did you specialize in Himalayan art? What about you, Chino Roncoroni?

 

Iwona Tenzing: I emigrated from Poland to the US in 1985. From 1988 to 2015, I worked at Xanadu Gallery in San Francisco, where my journey into Himalayan art began. In 1998, I organized my first Himalayan art exhibition at Xanadu, during which I met my future husband, Norbu Tenzing Norgay. My marriage to Norbu gave me a personal connection to the Himalayas.

 

My first journey to the Himalayas was in 2000, visiting Mount Kailash, which profoundly impacted me. Since then, Norbu and I have traveled annually to Upper Mustang, Nepal, exploring its rich Tibetan culture. In 2006, I launched Tenzing Asian Art to assist private collectors with Himalayan art collections. After Xanadu Gallery closed in 2015, I partnered with Chino Roncoroni, an esteemed dealer in Himalayan and Central Asian art. Together, we operate Tenzing Asian Art internationally, serving clients from San Francisco to Hong Kong.

 

Chino Franco Roncoroni: I grew up in southern Switzerland, where my love for antiques began. At 23, I moved to Ibiza and later traveled to India with my wife. Our experiences in India, especially in Benaras, deepened my understanding of art. We eventually settled in Kathmandu, Nepal, where I conducted over 40 treks in the Himalayas and engaged in various local projects. In 2014, I met Iwona Tenzing, whose keen eye and determination impressed me. We have since worked together, building a reputable partnership.

 

Can you describe your gallery and tell us more about your area of expertise?

 

Tenzing Asian Art specializes in early and significant Himalayan art, featuring early Buddhist objects from Kashmir, Pala India, and early Nepali art preserved in Tibet. Established in 2006 by Iwona Tenzing, the gallery expanded in 2015 with Chino Roncoroni’s partnership. Chino’s expertise has contributed to notable collections worldwide, including the Musée Guimet and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Together, we have facilitated major acquisitions for institutions like the Zhiguan Museum of Fine Art in Beijing and the Tsz Shan Monastery Buddhist Art Museum in Hong Kong. We collaborate closely with museum curators and hold private viewings internationally.

 

You’re taking part in this year’s edition of Printemps Asiatique Paris. Could you tell us what visitors can expect to see in your exhibition?

 

We will showcase bronze statues from the Himalayas dating from the 9th to 17th centuries, thangkas (scroll paintings) from the 11th to 16th centuries, and ritual objects.

Pourriez-vous décrire votre rôle en tant que directeur du musée départemental des arts asiatiques à Nice? Comment prépare-t-on une telle exposition ?

L’Asie sans réserve, c’est une réponse à une question que l’on nous pose presque tous les jours au musée : qu’avez-vous dans les réserves ? Dans l’opinion commune, on y cache des trésors alors qu’en réalité, les musées exposent au maximum leurs chefs-d’œuvre pour se montrer le plus attractif possible. Néanmoins, les réserves relèvent effectivement des œuvres extraordinaires que les équipes de conservation retirent des espaces d’exposition en raison de leur fragilité. Les textiles et les arts graphiques ne s’exposent que trois à quatre mois d’affilée à 50 lux et sont ensuite mises au repos pendant trois à quatre ans. Ces œuvres ne se régénèrent pas, bien sûr, mais cette règle permet de les faire durer le plus longtemps possible. Les réserves du musée départemental des arts asiatiques ont donc été le point de départ de ce projet, qui a d’autant plus de sens cette année en raison du 25ème anniversaire de l’institution. Et par extension, mon intérêt s’est porté sur les œuvres asiatiques conservées dans les réserves d’autres musées du territoire des Alpes-Maritimes pour montrer que l’histoire du patrimoine local comprend également une part d’Asie, dans des lieux auxquels on ne s’y attend pas. Sept institutions, dont l’université Côte d’Azur, le musée Matisse ou encore le château de la Napoule, ont participé à ce projet.  

 

Les objectifs de cette exposition sont nombreux : partager les enjeux de la conservation dans un musée, montrer qu’une collection vit grâce aux acquisitions, suivre les évolutions sur 25 ans de la collection du musée départemental des arts asiatiques, faire du musée un acteur de la valorisation des arts asiatiques dans le sud de la France, aider les musées partenaires à identifier leurs œuvres asiatiques, lancer une baisse du bilan carbone de la programmation d’expositions du musée (90% de la scénographie est récupérée). Cette exposition est riche en enjeux et constitue le premier volume d’une série d’expositions qui vont explorer les collections asiatiques présentes sur le territoire.

Detail of God Mahakala and His Entourage

Western Tibet, 15th-16th century

Distemper and gold on cloth

107 x 90 cm (42.1 x 35.5 in)

C-14 test range 1482–1637 (95.4%)

Provenance:

Hong Kong art market, 2016

Private Swiss collection,

acquired from the above

The Art Loss Register: 15045.9.CCF

 

Published:

Iwona Tenzing & Chino Roncoroni, Awakening (Tenzing Asian Art catalog, TEFAF Maastricht 2022), cat. no. 9 (with commentary by Amy Heller)

A highlight that will be on display in June?


We will feature a rare 7th-8th century Chinese repoussé plaque depicting a seated Buddha in meditation. This exquisite piece is comparable to early 8th-century Dunhuang cave paintings and reflects the rich artistic heritage of the Tang Dynasty. This type of votive plaque is rare. It was possibly made for pilgrims, who likely found them easier to manage when travelling than stone or bronze sculptures. There are a few related Tang Dynasty repoussé plaques in Japanese museums and private collections, known as oshidashi butsu (repoussé Buddha) and brought from China to Japan by returning pilgrims during the Tang Dynasty.

Pourriez-vous décrire votre rôle en tant que directeur du musée départemental des arts asiatiques à Nice? Comment prépare-t-on une telle exposition ?

L’Asie sans réserve, c’est une réponse à une question que l’on nous pose presque tous les jours au musée : qu’avez-vous dans les réserves ? Dans l’opinion commune, on y cache des trésors alors qu’en réalité, les musées exposent au maximum leurs chefs-d’œuvre pour se montrer le plus attractif possible. Néanmoins, les réserves relèvent effectivement des œuvres extraordinaires que les équipes de conservation retirent des espaces d’exposition en raison de leur fragilité. Les textiles et les arts graphiques ne s’exposent que trois à quatre mois d’affilée à 50 lux et sont ensuite mises au repos pendant trois à quatre ans. Ces œuvres ne se régénèrent pas, bien sûr, mais cette règle permet de les faire durer le plus longtemps possible. Les réserves du musée départemental des arts asiatiques ont donc été le point de départ de ce projet, qui a d’autant plus de sens cette année en raison du 25ème anniversaire de l’institution. Et par extension, mon intérêt s’est porté sur les œuvres asiatiques conservées dans les réserves d’autres musées du territoire des Alpes-Maritimes pour montrer que l’histoire du patrimoine local comprend également une part d’Asie, dans des lieux auxquels on ne s’y attend pas. Sept institutions, dont l’université Côte d’Azur, le musée Matisse ou encore le château de la Napoule, ont participé à ce projet.  

 

Les objectifs de cette exposition sont nombreux : partager les enjeux de la conservation dans un musée, montrer qu’une collection vit grâce aux acquisitions, suivre les évolutions sur 25 ans de la collection du musée départemental des arts asiatiques, faire du musée un acteur de la valorisation des arts asiatiques dans le sud de la France, aider les musées partenaires à identifier leurs œuvres asiatiques, lancer une baisse du bilan carbone de la programmation d’expositions du musée (90% de la scénographie est récupérée). Cette exposition est riche en enjeux et constitue le premier volume d’une série d’expositions qui vont explorer les collections asiatiques présentes sur le territoire.

Buddhist Votive Plaque

China, Tang Dynasty, 7th century

Gilt copper repoussé, wood casement

H. 7 1/2 in

Provenance:

Hong Kong art market, 1980s.

Kaikodo Gallery, Honolulu.

Idemitsu Museum, Tokyo.

Christie’s Hong Kong, Important Chinese Art, 2001, lot 507.

Private French collection,

acquired from the above.

French cultural passport 229284.

The Art Loss Register: 15045.21.CCF

Tenzing Asian Art.jpg

What are the gallery’s future projects?

 

We will be exhibiting at Frieze Masters in London in October 2024 and TEFAF Maastricht in 2025.


 

Find out more : 

Tenzing Asian Art

San Francisco (United States) and Hong Kong

Exhibits during Printemps Asiatique Paris

Galerie Xavier Eeckhout

8 bis rue Jacques Callot, 75006 Paris

Opening hours:

6 June: 11 am – 4 pm 

7 June: 11 am – 7 pm

8 June: 11 am – 6 pm

9 – 12 June: 11 am – 7 pm

13 June: 11 am – 6 pm

Pourriez-vous décrire votre rôle en tant que directeur du musée départemental des arts asiatiques à Nice? Comment prépare-t-on une telle exposition ?

L’Asie sans réserve, c’est une réponse à une question que l’on nous pose presque tous les jours au musée : qu’avez-vous dans les réserves ? Dans l’opinion commune, on y cache des trésors alors qu’en réalité, les musées exposent au maximum leurs chefs-d’œuvre pour se montrer le plus attractif possible. Néanmoins, les réserves relèvent effectivement des œuvres extraordinaires que les équipes de conservation retirent des espaces d’exposition en raison de leur fragilité. Les textiles et les arts graphiques ne s’exposent que trois à quatre mois d’affilée à 50 lux et sont ensuite mises au repos pendant trois à quatre ans. Ces œuvres ne se régénèrent pas, bien sûr, mais cette règle permet de les faire durer le plus longtemps possible. Les réserves du musée départemental des arts asiatiques ont donc été le point de départ de ce projet, qui a d’autant plus de sens cette année en raison du 25ème anniversaire de l’institution. Et par extension, mon intérêt s’est porté sur les œuvres asiatiques conservées dans les réserves d’autres musées du territoire des Alpes-Maritimes pour montrer que l’histoire du patrimoine local comprend également une part d’Asie, dans des lieux auxquels on ne s’y attend pas. Sept institutions, dont l’université Côte d’Azur, le musée Matisse ou encore le château de la Napoule, ont participé à ce projet.  

 

Les objectifs de cette exposition sont nombreux : partager les enjeux de la conservation dans un musée, montrer qu’une collection vit grâce aux acquisitions, suivre les évolutions sur 25 ans de la collection du musée départemental des arts asiatiques, faire du musée un acteur de la valorisation des arts asiatiques dans le sud de la France, aider les musées partenaires à identifier leurs œuvres asiatiques, lancer une baisse du bilan carbone de la programmation d’expositions du musée (90% de la scénographie est récupérée). Cette exposition est riche en enjeux et constitue le premier volume d’une série d’expositions qui vont explorer les collections asiatiques présentes sur le territoire.

bottom of page